Theatre review: Hairspray

REVIEW: Hairspray (Tour)

Grand Opera House, Belfast

Mon 30 Oct-Sat 4 Nov, 2017

Despite highlighting serious issues such as prejudice and intolerance, this show remains a popular, light-hearted and fun night of musical theatre and this latest touring production – courtesy of Mark Goucher, Matthew Gale and Laurence Myers – certainly kept it in this now famous ‘feel-good’ vibe.

Set in Baltimore in 1962, against a backdrop of racial segregation, the simple scenario of wanting teenagers of all colours to be able to dance together on a local TV dance programme with a campaign for integration on the show reflects the wider racial problem and the welcomed social change for acceptance at that time.

Opening with a look down at teenage Tracy in bed before hitting hard with one of the show’s most popular songs, Good Morning Baltimore, this production got off to a bright up-tempo start in a busy street scene with the dancers quickly establishing the two main communities of the piece, and – under Paul Kerryson’s direction – this theme was reinforced throughout (e.g. there was the telling line that “the TV is black and white”).

Staged with a practical and realistic brick house set at either side, this production used mobile trucks and effective projected scenery throughout to keep its fast-moving pace in place, while Philip Gladwell’s bright and colourful lighting plot brought a lot to the show and I loved, at the start of each Act, how the audience was flooded in moving coloured lights to create a fun atmosphere.

As a dance-orientated show, Drew McOnie’s choreography and movement was always slick, lively, entertaining and of its time and it was a brave decision to do a routine at one stage with several basketballs being thrown about on a crowded stage.

While the costumes were overly bright (for staging purposes to increase the fun and escapism elements of the production), they – like the hairstyles and footwear – were authentic for the era.

The mostly up-tempo score was varied with 60s Pop, Rhythm & Blues, Doo-Wop and Gospel influences, and Musical Director, Ben Atkinson, and his 7-piece on-stage band did well in keeping things moving at a lively pace and with such a full-on sound, despite this show being written for a much larger instrumentation line-up.

While the comic duet, You’re Timeless To Me, proved popular with audiences, songs like Mama, I’m A Big Girl Now and I Can Hear The Bells were well staged; the latter having a particular magical feel to it.

However, the big production numbers that really stood out were: Welcome To The 60s, complete with the female vocal trio’s sparkling dresses; the show-stopping and glorious piece of Gospel, I Know Where I’ve Been, which almost lifted the roof; and the all-singing, all-dancing finale, You Can’t Stop The Beat, with its totally infectious feel-good factor.

Sometimes there is something about the way a particular show is written, or is cast, that is simply annoying and, for me, it is why there is a tradition with this show of playing Tracy’s mother, Edna, as a ‘drag-role (i.e. always played by a man), as the character is not a drag queen, although was first played by one.

I feel it adds nothing to the show and is unnecessary … maybe it is just me and I am missing something obvious, but I just don’t get it.

However, that said, this is certainly no reflection on the talents of Matt Rixon, who played the role of the large, kind and shy Edna superbly in what could best be described as a towering performance, especially against the physically smaller, Norman Pace, as her ever-joking but loving husband, Wilbur (maybe the comic effect of their physical contrast is the reason for the ‘drag-role’?).

Brenda Edwards’ super soulful vocals made her perfect for the part of the sassy and determined Motormouth Maybelle, while the experienced performance by Gina Murray, as the producer and controlling mother, Velma, was a show-stealer here and this scheming villainess must surely be the most glamorous ‘baddie’ of them all.

If Velma was the baddie, then young Rebecca Mendoza was the ‘goodie’ here, making a good impression in her professional debut as the big-hearted and teenage Tracy.

All were well supported by the lively ensemble and others like Jon Tsouras’ self-loving Corney, Layton Williams’ energetic and deservedly popular, Seaweed, Edward Chitticks’ heart-throb pop star, Link, Aimee Moore’s selfish and not so talented wannabe, Amber, and Annalise Liard-Bailey – another recent theatre graduate – as the dim but beautiful, Penny.

If you are quick, you might be lucky enough to get one of the few remaining tickets for this show’s Belfast run, but there is one thing you can’t do … You Can’t Stop The Beat!

Damien Murray

Post Author: Belfast Times

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